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  • Writer's pictureCatie Staszak

Education, Culture and Equestrian Sport Converge at FEI World Cup™ Finals for Omaha’s Youth


Young fans at the FEI World Cup™ Finals in Omaha (USA) in 2017 - Photo Credit: AJ Olnes


This week, more than 80 of the world’s top athletes from the disciplines of Jumping, Dressage and Vaulting will congregate at the CHI Health Center Omaha in Nebraska (USA) for the FEI World Cup™ Finals, where, over the course of five days, they will compete for the ultimate honour of becoming FEI World Cup Champion in their respective disciplines - a title steeped in history - in front of an enthusiastic crowd and global media from around the world.


But for the more than 1,000 elementary school students bound for the event through the Omaha Equestrian Foundation’s (OEF) field trip programme, the event might mark the first time several children ever get to lay eyes on a sport horse.


Thirty-eight schools and homeschool programmes will visit the Finals with a mostly academic objective—and a bit of homework.


OEF has partnered with Prairie Stem to create STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) kits for students to create prior to attending the Finals. Based out of Omaha, Prairie Stem is an education-based non-profit organisation that seeks to improve critical thinking and creativity in students, from Pre-Kindergarteners to high school seniors.

The World Cup-themed STEAM Kits challenge students to create their own working horse carousel in one of four designs: Dressage, Jumping, Vaulting and Lakota painted horse—a nod to Omaha’s cultural history.


The Lakota, a Native American people, were among Nebraska’s earliest settlers, and Lakota is a dialect of the indigenous language, Sioux. “Omaha” means “to go against the current” in Sioux, a nod to the Omaha tribe’s journey to the Nebraska territory. The Omaha Tribe of Nebraska thrived through the 1700s and were known for their hunting and farming. Today, the Omaha reservation, located in Macy, NE is home to about 3,000 residents.


Among the field trip exhibits for visiting students will reference Omaha’s Native American roots, from a full-size fiberglass horse (to demonstrate Lakota symbology); Native American tribal artifacts; and live and visual storytellers.


They will also be exposed to equestrian sport and horsemanship. Students will get hands on with grooming and receive an introduction to horse care; go on a virtual ride using Virtual Reality headsets; and explore a variety of equine and agricultural career paths.


"We feel that a very important part of running such historically important events such as the FEI World Cup Finals is to inspire and educate the next generation of equestrian athletes and horse lovers” said Julie Boilesen, CEO of Equestrian Omaha. "The equine legacy in Omaha is deep-rooted in our culture and history, so we are proud to honour our equine athletes by introducing our youth to them in this way."


The legacy continues for Omaha after hosting the FEI World Cup Finals™ back in 2017, and they are providing the kids with undoubtedly one of the more unique types of classroom, as the young students will be learning in the arena and schooling area from some of the best equestrian athletes in the world. As they experience horsemanship and our majestic equine athletes up close and personal - valuable lessons that will stay with them for a long time to come.


Perhaps it will mark the start of an equestrian pursuit for a few young, stargazing students.

The 2023 FEI World Cup™ Finals is set for 4-8 April 2023 in Omaha. To learn more, visit https://omaha2023.fei.org/.

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